The Environmental and Natural Resource Economics major prepares students to apply economic tools to evaluate the allocation and utilization of natural resources and the management of the natural environment. Economic analysis provides a strong basis to guide societal choices that directly and indirectly affect our environment. Economic theory provides a framework for understanding both environmental and natural resource issues, predicting the likely effects of government policies and regulations, and devising solutions to pressing economic and environmental problems.

This major differentiates from other programs of study that address natural resource management in that it focuses on weighing the private and public implications of choices that we make ranging from a local through a global scale. To strengthen their technical training, students majoring in environmental and natural resource economics can simultaneously complete a second major in Natural Resource Management or other more specialized majors offered through the Warner College of Natural Resources.

Learning Outcomes

Successful students will demonstrate:

  • Technical competency including appropriate use of economic theory in formulating analytical problems, identifying and gathering appropriate data, and employing appropriate economic methods to analyze those problems, utilizing appropriate available computer technology.
  • Ability to solve real-world problems beyond the pedagogical context. Students will be able to identify a problem and its scope, evaluate resources available to address the problem, formulate alternative solutions, and select the solution(s) most consistent with a stated objective.
  • Proficiency in oral and written communication including the ability to communicate critically and analytically at a professional level.

Potential Occupations

Environmental and resource economists are employed in a wide range of fields from education and research to business and government. Profit and non-profit organizations employ economists in overseas and community development, international relations, and environmental and conservation analyses. Participation in internships, volunteer activities, and cooperative education opportunities is highly recommended to enhance practical training and development. Graduates who seek further specialization are prepared to pursue advanced studies.

Some examples include, but are not limited to, energy resource analyst, environmental researcher/analyst, resource policy analyst, natural resource analyst, environmental pollution analyst, environmental policy analyst, economic analyst/forecaster, land use planner, overseas development specialist, rural community organizer, community development specialist, financial analyst, foreign trade analyst, market forecaster, and extension agent.

Effective Fall 2015

Freshman
AUCCCredits
AGRI 192Orientation to Agricultural Systems 1
AREC 202Agricultural and Resource Economics (GT-SS1)3C3
Select four credits from the following: 4
Principles of Animal Biology (GT-SC2)3A 
Principles of Plant Biology (GT-SC1)3A 
Attributes of Living Systems (GT-SC1)3A 
CO 150College Composition (GT-CO2)1A3
CS 110Personal Computing 4
ECON 204Principles of Macroeconomics (GT-SS1)3C3
MATH 117College Algebra in Context I (GT-MA1)1B1
MATH 118College Algebra in Context II (GT-MA1)1B1
MATH 124Logarithmic and Exponential Functions (GT-MA1)1B1
Arts and Humanities3B3
Biological and Physical Sciences3A3
Natural Resource or Agriculture Elective1 3
 Total Credits 30
Sophomore
 
ACT 205Fundamentals of Accounting 3
MATH 141Calculus in Management Sciences (GT-MA1)1B3
SPCM 200Public Speaking 3
Advanced Writing23
Foundations and Perspectives3B, 3D, 3E9
Natural Resource or Agriculture Elective1 3
Electives 6
 Total Credits 30
Junior
 
AREC 240/ECON 240Issues in Environmental Economics (GT-SS1)3C3
AREC 305 or FIN 305Agricultural and Resource Enterprise Analysis
Fundamentals of Finance
 3
AREC 335/ECON 335Introduction to Econometrics 3
AREC 340/ECON 340Introduction: Economics of Natural Resources 3
AREC 375 or POLS 361Agricultural Law
U.S. Environmental Politics and Policy
 3
ECON 306Intermediate Microeconomics 3
STAT 301Introduction to Statistical Methods 3
Natural Resource or Agriculture Electives1 6
Electives 3
 Total Credits 30
Senior
 
AREC 341Environmental Economics 3
AREC 342Water Law, Policy, and Institutions 3
AREC 346/ECON 346Economics of Outdoor Recreation 3
AREC 440Advanced Environmental and Resource Economics4A,4C3
AREC 460Ag- and Resource-Based Economic Development4B3
AREC 478Agricultural Policy4B3
ECON 304Intermediate Macroeconomics 3
AREC or ECON Electives2 3
Natural Resource or Agriculture Elective1 3
Electives3 3
 Total Credits 30
 Program Total Credits: 120
1

Select from courses with AGED, AGRI, ANEQ, BSPM, BZ, CBE, CHEM, CIVE, ECOL, ESS, FW, F, GEOL, GES, HORT, LAND, LIFE, NR, NRRT, RS, SOCR, or WR subject codes.

2

Select credits from AREC and/or ECON courses.

3

Select enough elective credits to bring program total to 120 credits with a minimum of 42 upper-division (300- to 400-level) credits.

Freshman
Semester 1CriticalRecommendedAUCCCredits
AGRI 192Orientation to Agricultural Systems   1
AREC 202Agricultural and Resource Economics (GT-SS1)X 3C3
CS 110Personal Computing   4
MATH 117College Algebra in Context I (GT-MA1)X 1B1
MATH 118College Algebra in Context II (GT-MA1)  1B1
MATH 124Logarithmic and Exponential Functions (GT-MA1)  1B1
Arts and Humanities  3B3
 Total Credits   14
Semester 2CriticalRecommendedAUCCCredits
Select four credits from the following:   4
Principles of Animal Biology (GT-SC2)  3A 
Principles of Plant Biology (GT-SC1)  3A 
Attributes of Living Systems (GT-SC1)  3A 
CO 150College Composition (GT-CO2)X 1A3
ECON 204Principles of Macroeconomics (GT-SS1)  3C3
Biological and Physical Sciences  3A3
Natural Resource or Agricultural Elective (See allowable subject codes on Program Requirements Tab)   3
AUCC 1B (MATH) must be completed by the end of Semester 2.X   
 Total Credits   16
Sophomore
Semester 3CriticalRecommendedAUCCCredits
ACT 205Fundamentals of Accounting   3
MATH 141Calculus in Management Sciences (GT-MA1)X 1B3
Arts and Humanities  3B3
Historical Perspectives  3D3
Elective   3
 Total Credits   15
Semester 4CriticalRecommendedAUCCCredits
SPCM 200Public Speaking   3
Advanced Writing  23
Global and Cultural Awareness  3E3
Natural Resource or Agricultural Elective (See allowable subject codes on Program Requirements Tab)   3
Elective   3
ACT 205, ECON 204, and CS 110 must be completed by the end of Semester 4.X   
 Total Credits   15
Junior
Semester 5CriticalRecommendedAUCCCredits
AREC 240/ECON 240Issues in Environmental Economics (GT-SS1)  3C3
Select one course from the following:   3
Agricultural and Resource Enterprise Analysis    
Fundamentals of Finance    
Select one course from the following:   3
Agricultural Law    
U.S. Environmental Politics and Policy    
STAT 301Introduction to Statistical MethodsX  3
Natural Resource or Agricultural Elective (See allowable subject codes on Program Requirements Tab)   3
 Total Credits   15
Semester 6CriticalRecommendedAUCCCredits
AREC 335/ECON 335Introduction to Econometrics   3
AREC 340/ECON 340Introduction: Economics of Natural ResourcesX  3
ECON 306Intermediate Microeconomics   3
Natural Resource or Agricultural Elective (See allowable subject codes on Program Requirements Tab)   3
Elective   3
 Total Credits   15
Senior
Semester 7CriticalRecommendedAUCCCredits
AREC 346/ECON 346Economics of Outdoor RecreationX  3
AREC 341Environmental EconomicsX  3
ECON 304Intermediate Macroeconomics   3
AREC or ECON Elective   3
Elective   3
 Total Credits   15
Semester 8CriticalRecommendedAUCCCredits
AREC 342Water Law, Policy, and InstitutionsX  3
AREC 440Advanced Environmental and Resource EconomicsX 4A,4C3
AREC 460Ag- and Resource-Based Economic DevelopmentX 4B3
AREC 478Agricultural PolicyX 4B3
Natural Resource or Agricultural Elective (See allowable subject codes on Program Requirements Tab)X  3
The benchmark courses for the 8th semester are the remaining courses in the entire program of study.X   
 Total Credits   15
 Program Total Credits:   120