The Master of Science in Radiological Health Sciences focuses on cancer research and the role of ionizing radiation in inducing, diagnosing and treating cancer.

Program Level Learning Objectives:

Graduates with a Master of Science in Radiological Health Sciences are able to:

  • Apply knowledge of radiation exposure on health and of related fields, including radiation physics, radiation chemistry, radiation biology and statistics.
  • Apply knowledge of radiation exposure for the purpose of diagnosis and cancer therapy.
  • Formulate a hypothesis, design and conduct experiments, analyze and interpret data.
  • Function with some independence in multi-disciplinary teams.
  • Identify and solve problems associated with the effects of radiation exposure on health.
  • Adhere to the standards of professional and ethical responsibility of the field.
  • Communicate effectively both orally and in writing.

Effective Fall 2021

ERHS 550Principles of Radiation Biology 15
ERHS 699Thesis3-6
ERHS 770Radiation/Cancer Biology-Comparative Oncology 22
STAR 511Design and Data Analysis for Researchers I4
Select one of the following courses:3
Radiological Physics and Dosimetry I
Physics of Diagnostic Imaging
Radiation Therapy Physics
Electives (500-level or above) 310-13
Program Total Credits:30

A minimum of 30 credits are required to complete this program. 

Effective Fall 2021

Select one of the following courses:3-5
Introduction to Radiation Biology
Principles of Radiation Biology 1
Select one of the following courses:1
Radiation/Cancer Biology-Comparative Oncology
Seminar
Select one of the following courses:3-4
Design and Data Analysis for Researchers I
Introduction to Biostatistics
Applied Data Analysis
Select one of the following courses:3
Radiological Physics and Dosimetry I
Physics of Diagnostic Imaging
Radiation Therapy Physics
Electives (500-level or above) 217-20
Program Total Credits:30

A minimum of 30 credits are required to complete this program. 

A prospective or high-quality retrospective research project is required. Research projects must be reviewed and approved by the student's advisor and graduate committee. The final exam/oral defense includes two basic parts. First, the student presents the results of their research project and answers questions on the design, results and possible future directions of this project. In the second part of the exam, the student will need to answer more general questions related to diagnostic imaging similar to the topics they need to study for the American College of Veterinary Radiology (ACVR) board.